Dating vintage slingerland drums

These badges also adorned the aluminum Acrolite snare from 1994 to the mid 2000s, when the drum featured a Black Galaxy Sparkle finish.

Slingerland is a drum manufacturer originally based out of Chicago, Ill., that has produced quality drum sets and snare drums since 1928.

The drum brand was famously played by Buddy Rich, who's still considered one of the greatest drummers of all time.

The lion’s share of vintage Ludwig drums available on the market hail from the company’s golden years of the '60s, '70s, and early '80s.

The fifty years from Ludwig’s inception in 1909 to the early 1960s deserves its own article, so in order to give you the most pertinent information for dating, we’ll be looking at drums from the early '60s onwards.

In addition, the Keystone badge was reintroduced on certain models in the early '80s.

Whereas the Keystone badge only had two iterations (one from 1960-63 featuring no serial number and an update from 1964-69 with serial number found at the top or bottom of the badge), the Blue & Olive badge went through a number of modifications from its introduction in 1969 through the mid-'80s.

The Blue & Olive badge replaced the Keystone in 1969, so there’s some natural overlap.

If you find yourself wondering if your Blue & Olive badge might be a ‘69, a quick consultation of the serial number will clear up any uncertainty.

These are the gold standards for identifying a vintage Ludwig drum.

The general rule of thumb is a “Keystone” badge indicates a drum from the '60s and a “Blue & Olive” badge indicates a drum from the '70s or early '80s.

In addition, individual owners may have trimmed the badges themselves, so consulting a serial number will provide a better gauge on the drum.

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